Root Canal FAQ

If you’ve never had a root canal, you may have questions about what the experience is like. If you need a root canal in Thornton CO, knowing what to expect can make the experience overall less scary. In particular, many people who need a root canal want to know whether the experience is painful. The more you know going into the procedure, the better off you are.

Are root canals painful?

Root canals are usually not very painful because the dentist uses local anesthesia to numb the tooth and gums before the root canal takes place. In fact, most people say they experienced little or no pain during their root canal procedure. However, you may be experiencing a lot of pain before the root canal takes place. The faster you get the root canal, the better!

Is it uncomfortable when the procedure is over?

Most people state that if they did experience pain during the root canal, it’s over within about one day of the procedure. If you continue to experience discomfort after your root canal is over, you should talk to your dentist. Your dentist can determine whether something is going wrong.

Can you put off getting a root canal?

Root canals are only necessary when the inside of your tooth has become infected and begun to decay. If you need a root canal, putting it off can lead to further decay, a more severe infection and more pain.

If you put off your root canal, the tooth may become so damaged that it needs to be removed. If you are experiencing severe tooth pain, it’s important to see your root canal specialist in Thornton CO as soon as possible to get your tooth examined.

Are you experiencing severe tooth pain? Need a root canal? Call Colorado Root Canal Specialist

At Colorado Root Canal Specialist, we help patients like you to take care of their teeth when they’re in need of treatment. We perform root canals to help you maintain healthy teeth now and into the future. Call today to make an appointment if you need a root canal.

What is a Root Canal?

Every year 15 million Americans get a root canal, according to the American Association of Endodontists. Although root canals in Thornton are common, many Americans are confused about what they entail. If your dentist has told you that you need a root canal, it’s likely that you have several questions about this procedure. Here is what you need to know about roots canals.

What is a Root Canal?

A root canal is a dental treatment that gets rid of the bacteria found in the tooth. The process involves removing the infected pulp within the tooth and then cleaning the tooth before filling it and sealing it. The root canal is designed to hopefully save the tooth and avoid replacing it completely. Root canals have been considered a routine dental treatment for many decades now. This is a straightforward procedure and typically can be completed in one or two sessions.

Is a Root Canal Painful?

Many patients want to know if a root canal in Thornton will hurt. Since a root canal is an invasive treatment, there is pain associated with it. However, the patient needn’t feel any pain during a root canal. Often, the anxiety leading up to the treatment is worse than the actual root canal. During a root canal procedure, the patient is given anesthesia so they won’t feel any pain. The area is also numbed with a local, topical analgesic. After treatment, the area may be sore and the patient likely won’t be able to eat solid food for one or two days. Your Thornton dentist will recommend over-the-counter painkillers to keep discomfort at bay. The patient will also have aftercare instructions that cover all aspects of recovers.

When is a Root Canal Necessary?

A root canal may be necessary when the patient has an inflamed or infected tooth. Since the goal is to save the natural tooth and maintain the natural appearance, normal bite pattern and keep proper chewing mechanisms then the dentist may need to perform a root canal on the damaged tooth. Most patients who come in for a root canal have been experiencing pain when they bite or chew, chipped teeth or a cracked tooth, hot and cold sensitivity, swollen or enlarged gums and decaying gums.

When you get a root canal in Thornton at our practice, you can be sure you will be made as comfortable as possible. For more information about root canals and your dental health, please contact us.

 

How to Treat Pain After a Root Canal

Whether you’ve already had a root canal or you’re anticipating problems that might come after, pain is likely your top priority. The good news is that severe pain after a root canal is uncommon, thanks largely to serious advancements in dentistry. We’ll look at what’s normal and how you can treat it.

What’s Causing the Pain After a Root Canal?

Usually, it’s the residual sensitivity from the cleaning process that’s causing your pain. When a dentist clears out the pulp from the chamber of the tooth, they have to create an opening to access the interior. You may feel the effects of this for a few days after the treatment. If you’re planning to go in for another treatment (usually for a crown), know that the pain and sensitivity are often better the second time around.

How Can I Treat Pain After a Root Canal?

You should be able to control the pain with over-the-counter medications, such as Tylenol or Advil. You may have to try both to get a sense of which one works best for you. Just make sure that you’re taking them as indicated, and check with a doctor to ensure that this regimen won’t interfere with any prescriptions you may be taking for other medical conditions.

If you want to treat your pain naturally, try meditation or yoga as a way of relaxing the body and focusing the mind. During this time, you also should be taking care of your teeth, avoiding crunchy foods, and abstaining from smoking.

What’s Abnormal After a Root Canal?

Severe pain is abnormal, so if it’s lasting for more than a few days, you should contact your dentist and ask about what to do next. While it’s rare, it’s possible for complications to develop after a root canal. If the pain or swelling is getting worse, you may need another cleaning session to ensure that all pulp has been safely removed.

Root canals get a bad reputation, but the truth is that they’re regular procedures that can eliminate a far worse problem in a relatively short amount of time. While some degree of pain can be expected, it’s usually easily managed with a few simple solutions.

 

Signs that Indicate It May Be Time for a Root Canal

A root canal (aka root canal therapy or endodontic therapy) is a dental procedure performed when decay affects the soft core of a tooth.

What is a Root Canal?

This dental procedure is used to clean out the decay that has settled within the pulp and root of a tooth. Once decay reaches the soft core, the pulp may get infected or become inflamed. Sometimes, this decay can lead to the death of the affected tooth.

The Layers of a Tooth

To protect the tooth, the first layer consists of a hard coating called enamel, beneath this outermost layer is a bony tissue called dentin (which forms the bulk of the tooth) and within the dentin is a soft core that extends to the root located in the jawbone. This soft core houses the dental pulp. This pulp consists of blood vessels, connective tissue and nerves.

During a root canal, the decay is cleaned out of the tooth. Cleaning out the decay allows the infected tooth itself to be preserved.

Root Canal Procedure Steps

The procedure:

  1. Decay and bacteria are extracted from the pulp, root and nerve.
  2. The area is disinfected with antibiotics and filled.
  3. To prevent new decay, the area is sealed.
  4. Once the root canal is complete, the tooth is covered with a crown (i.e., a prosthetic tooth).

3 Signs that a Root Canal My Be in Your Near Future

  1. Pain in the Affected Tooth

Pain is a signal that there is a problem.

The pain can:

  • Range from mild to excruciating.
  • Come and go.
  • Last continuously for hours, or even days.
  • Only be present upon chewing.

If the issue causing the pain is disregarded, the pain usually changes in its quality or intensity. Many times, pain requiring a root canal causes mild discomfort that progresses to extreme pain and sensitivity. Left untreated, an infection or an abscess (i.e., a blister filled with pus that forms near the affected tooth) may develop.

The only way to know for sure whether a root canal is required is to seek dental treatment from an experienced dental professional.

  1. Tooth Discoloration

Although teeth can become stained, if you notice that only one of your teeth is darkening in color or turning a grayish-black, the internal tissue may be breaking down and damaging the tooth’s roots. To find out if the tooth requires a root canal, you should make an appointment with a seasoned dental professional like Dr. Robert McBride, DDS, at Colorado Root Canal Specialist in Thornton, Colorado.

  1. Sensitivity to Hot and Cold

Sensitive teeth can occur for a variety of reasons, however, if this is a new symptom, it may signal that your inner tooth is infected. This sensitivity can be mild or severe.

What to Expect After a Root Canal

After a root canal, you might experience pain or a sense of soreness, however, over-the-counter, anti-inflammatory pain relievers (e.g., ibuprofen) can help with this discomfort.

Most patients require very little downtime (if any), returning to their daily routine directly after their procedure, nonetheless, until the permanent crown is placed, patients should avoid chewing on the temporary one.

If you are experiencing tooth pain, temperature sensitivity or you notice that your tooth is darkening, seeking treatment early offers the best prognosis. Contact Colorado Root Canal Specialist today to schedule an appointment with Dr. Robert McBride, DDS. To schedule by phone, please call 1-303-920-9145 or use the online request form by clicking here.

Colorado Root Canal Specialist, 13762 Colorado Boulevard, #154 in Thornton, Colorado.

 

Recognizing a Dental Emergency with Your Root Canal

Root canals are one of the most-performed dental procedures. While effective for rescuing a tooth that may otherwise be lost, occasionally, problems can arise after treatment. Here is a look at a few issues that can come up after your procedure that should be handled as an emergency.

You are experiencing severe pain.

It is relatively normal to have some pain after a root canal, but it should be more like mild discomfort that is easily handled with over-the-counter pain relievers. If you feel intense, severe pain once the anesthetic wears off when you get home, it is best to get in touch with the dentist to get their opinion on the situation.

You find the dental canal filling in your food.

If the root canal filling falls out, it is imperative that you get to the dentist as quickly as possible. You may not necessarily have pain, but you may feel sensitivity if the air hits your tooth or if you eat something cold or hot. You can use a temporary filling or some food-grade wax to cover the opening in your tooth. This can help deter sensitivity pain and keep food particles from getting inside the canal.

Your gums swell severely around the root canal site.

You can expect a small amount of inflammation around the tooth that just had a root canal placed. This general inflammation should subside after a few days as the irritated ligaments and tissue go back to normal. If beyond the first few days after your root canal, you are dealing with a major amount of swelling, it is best to get to the dentist. You may have issues with infection around the tooth that needs to be handled so it can properly heal after the procedure. Also, be attentive to anything that looks like pus or infection or small pimples around the tooth as these can also be signs of an infection.

Save Your Tooth with a Root Canal in Thornton, CO

When done by a professional with enough experience, a root canal will rarely ever cause you any issue and can essentially save your tooth from extraction. Reach out to us at Colorado Root Canal Specialist if you think you need a root canal or have issues with an existing root canal.

 

Getting a Root Canal? Get Rid of the Myths First!

A root canal sounds a little scary, and even though it is one of the most commonly performed dental treatments, it is also the one treatment associated with the most prevailing myths. Before you go in for a root canal, it is best if you know what to expect without the myths clouding your expectations or making you afraid. Here is a look at some of the more common myths about the root canal treatment and the real facts you can count on.

Myth: A root canal is a long, grueling process.

Root canals do not take all that long to complete. The dentist is essentially doing a deep filling in your tooth. You can expect the procedure to take between 30 and 60 minutes in most cases, but a more complex case may take about 90 minutes for your full appointment.

Myth: Root canals usually fail.

It is rare for a root canal to fail. In terms of this dental treatment, a root canal failure would mean that the inserted filling comes out, which can happen if a tooth is in severe enough shape before the treatment. Normally, there is no issue with this, but root canals can fail if there are unaddressed issues with infection.

Myth: You can see the difference when a root canal is done.

You can’t see a root canal in a tooth at all from the exterior. This myth comes from outdated dental treatment practices that often relied on amalgam filling material, which is grey and could be slightly visible through the tooth in some cases. Modern root canals are performed with a mixture of amalgam, composite, and other filling materials. Amalgam materials may be used lower in the root and composite used in the outer part of the tooth to retain its color and appearance.

Talk to Us About Your Root Canal Questions

When you have a root canal performed, you can be adding years of life and use to a tooth that you would otherwise lose. It is so important to get a root canal right away if this is something your dentist that your dentist is recommending. Reach out to us at Colorado Root Canal Specialist to schedule an appointment if you believe you need a root canal.

How to Recover From a Root Canal

If you have had a deep cavity and it became untreatable, it is most likely that your dentist prescribed a root canal. If you have gone through the procedure, it may take a while before you feel like yourself again. Read on to find out how you can expedite the recovery process and resume your daily routine after a short relaxation period.

Pay Close Attention to How Your Mouth Feels and What You Eat

Pay close attention to how your mouth feels immediately after the root canal. While it is common to experience some swelling and pain after the procedure, you can lessen this if you use your mouth carefully. Do not attempt to eat until the numbness has subsided. You may bite your tongue and hurt yourself if you eat while your mouth is still numb. Plan your meals carefully for the first few days after the surgery. Incorporate nutritious foods that do not require a lot of chewing and will not hurt your tooth. You can opt for smoothies or soups.

Get Enough Rest

Just like any other surgery, you need adequate rest after a root canal for you to recover. Get enough sleep to help you speed up the recovery process so that you are back on your feet as fast as possible. A root canal can make your mouth tender and uncomfortable, making you extremely tired. Take a day or two off after the procedure to hasten recovery. You are most likely to recover faster and better if you rest, as opposed to trying to go on with life as if nothing happened.

Be Keen to Identify Any Problems With Your Crown

Most people usually have a temporary crown put on after a root canal. Pay keen attention to the crown to notice if there is any irritation or pain when you eat. Contact your dentist immediately if your temporary crown causes swelling or pain. Although you will get your permanent crown after a few days, it is vital to monitor the temporary one to prevent any possible infections. When you get your permanent crown, continue monitoring it as well.

A root canal will repair your decayed tooth and eliminate infections. Do not be scared about recovery because if you eat the right foods, have enough rest, and follow your dentist’s advice, you will soon be back on your feet.

 

How to Prepare For a Root Canal

When the tooth’s nerves and the pulp becomes inflamed or infected, your doctor may recommend root canal treatment. During a root canal procedure, the interior part of the tooth is cleaned and dried. A dentist then adds a temporary filling. One of the primary reasons the procedure is carried out is if a person is experiencing deep decay. This occurs when bacteria in the mouth produce acids that damage the teeth. If left untreated, tooth decay can result in excruciating pain and tooth loss. Here’s how you should prepare for a root canal:

Stay Away from Alcohol

It’s normal to feel anxious before a root canal, and you may be tempted to get drunk to reduce the worry. Avoiding alcohol means you’ll be mentally and physically ready for the dental procedure. A root canal isn’t a painful treatment, as many people tend to think. When you get drunk, you’ll only make the discomfort associated with the root canal worse. Also, dentists will inject local anesthetics into the gums during the treatment, which may lead to adverse reactions to alcohol.

Ensure You Eat

When preparing to undergo a root canal, a lot of things may come into your mind. For example, you may be wondering whether or not to eat. You’re not alone. Many physicians recommend their patients to take normal meals before going for a root canal. After the procedure has been completed, you will be numb, and you may not feel like eating for a while. If you decide to eat while experiencing the numbness, you risk biting your tongue.

Avoid Taking Medications Before Your Appointment

Unless your doctor has prescribed some drugs, ensure you avoid them before you go for root canal treatment. Some people may decide to take painkillers before an appointment. This causes discomfort and makes it hard for physicians to offer the right diagnosis. According to experts, pain management medications tend to mask discomfort you may experience after a root canal.

Get Some Rest

Having plenty of rest is necessary to ensure the effectiveness of the dental procedure. Many people tend to be nervous when undergoing a root canal. However, technological advancements have helped to improve the experience. Failure to get adequate sleep will result in more anxiety and irritability. Also, note that the recovery process for human bodies is faster when at rest. Therefore, sleeping is also necessary after treatment.

For more information about preparing for your root canal, talk to your Colorado Root Canal Specialist.