Common Symptoms of Dental Trauma

Dental trauma occurs when something impactful affects the inside of the mouth, lips, teeth, gums, tongue or jawbone. Most often, your dentist in Thornton sees dental trauma after a physical incident, such as a sports injury, vehicle accident, human physical altercation or a fall. Dental trauma can be very serious and should always be attended to by a dentist. However, sometimes dental trauma isn’t obvious. In that case, it can go untreated and quickly develop into something even more serious. Here are some common signs of dental trauma.

Fractures

Following an incident of some kind, a fracture may develop in a tooth or jawbone. Fractures can be so small that they can only be seen with an x-ray. They also vary as to the depth that they occur. Superficial fractures may occur on the surface of the teeth or bone and cause little trouble. But deeper fractures can make the tooth more vulnerable to bacteria, easily breakable and more sensitive to heat or cold. If you suddenly have one or more sensitive teeth after an incident, chances are you may have fractured a tooth. Deep fractures in the jawbone can lead to TMJ and other serious problems, including tooth loss.

Tooth Displacement

Another common symptom of dental trauma may be a loose tooth or a permanent tooth that’s been knocked out of its socket. These are both situations where you’ll need to see a dentist right away. Loose teeth from dental trauma can often be saved by your Thornton dentist, but you need to make an appointment as soon as possible. Even a tooth that’s been knocked out as a small chance of being saved, and if you contact your dentist immediately.

Earache and Vertigo

Patients are often surprised to discover that their sudden painful earache is the result of dental trauma along the jawbone. Anytime the jawbone is injured, the ear may be affected. You may even have vertigo, since the ear is primarily responsible for balance and equilibrium. Don’t ignore an earache or dizziness, especially if it occurs soon after an incident.

Your mouth and jaw are not meant to be hit. Your teeth, especially, are not well-protected against physical trauma. Anytime you experience an incident and suspect dental trauma, contact your dentist for a thorough exam.

 

Signs that Indicate It May Be Time for a Root Canal

A root canal (aka root canal therapy or endodontic therapy) is a dental procedure performed when decay affects the soft core of a tooth.

What is a Root Canal?

This dental procedure is used to clean out the decay that has settled within the pulp and root of a tooth. Once decay reaches the soft core, the pulp may get infected or become inflamed. Sometimes, this decay can lead to the death of the affected tooth.

The Layers of a Tooth

To protect the tooth, the first layer consists of a hard coating called enamel, beneath this outermost layer is a bony tissue called dentin (which forms the bulk of the tooth) and within the dentin is a soft core that extends to the root located in the jawbone. This soft core houses the dental pulp. This pulp consists of blood vessels, connective tissue and nerves.

During a root canal, the decay is cleaned out of the tooth. Cleaning out the decay allows the infected tooth itself to be preserved.

Root Canal Procedure Steps

The procedure:

  1. Decay and bacteria are extracted from the pulp, root and nerve.
  2. The area is disinfected with antibiotics and filled.
  3. To prevent new decay, the area is sealed.
  4. Once the root canal is complete, the tooth is covered with a crown (i.e., a prosthetic tooth).

3 Signs that a Root Canal My Be in Your Near Future

  1. Pain in the Affected Tooth

Pain is a signal that there is a problem.

The pain can:

  • Range from mild to excruciating.
  • Come and go.
  • Last continuously for hours, or even days.
  • Only be present upon chewing.

If the issue causing the pain is disregarded, the pain usually changes in its quality or intensity. Many times, pain requiring a root canal causes mild discomfort that progresses to extreme pain and sensitivity. Left untreated, an infection or an abscess (i.e., a blister filled with pus that forms near the affected tooth) may develop.

The only way to know for sure whether a root canal is required is to seek dental treatment from an experienced dental professional.

  1. Tooth Discoloration

Although teeth can become stained, if you notice that only one of your teeth is darkening in color or turning a grayish-black, the internal tissue may be breaking down and damaging the tooth’s roots. To find out if the tooth requires a root canal, you should make an appointment with a seasoned dental professional like Dr. Robert McBride, DDS, at Colorado Root Canal Specialist in Thornton, Colorado.

  1. Sensitivity to Hot and Cold

Sensitive teeth can occur for a variety of reasons, however, if this is a new symptom, it may signal that your inner tooth is infected. This sensitivity can be mild or severe.

What to Expect After a Root Canal

After a root canal, you might experience pain or a sense of soreness, however, over-the-counter, anti-inflammatory pain relievers (e.g., ibuprofen) can help with this discomfort.

Most patients require very little downtime (if any), returning to their daily routine directly after their procedure, nonetheless, until the permanent crown is placed, patients should avoid chewing on the temporary one.

If you are experiencing tooth pain, temperature sensitivity or you notice that your tooth is darkening, seeking treatment early offers the best prognosis. Contact Colorado Root Canal Specialist today to schedule an appointment with Dr. Robert McBride, DDS. To schedule by phone, please call 1-303-920-9145 or use the online request form by clicking here.

Colorado Root Canal Specialist, 13762 Colorado Boulevard, #154 in Thornton, Colorado.

 

Getting a Root Canal? Get Rid of the Myths First!

A root canal sounds a little scary, and even though it is one of the most commonly performed dental treatments, it is also the one treatment associated with the most prevailing myths. Before you go in for a root canal, it is best if you know what to expect without the myths clouding your expectations or making you afraid. Here is a look at some of the more common myths about the root canal treatment and the real facts you can count on.

Myth: A root canal is a long, grueling process.

Root canals do not take all that long to complete. The dentist is essentially doing a deep filling in your tooth. You can expect the procedure to take between 30 and 60 minutes in most cases, but a more complex case may take about 90 minutes for your full appointment.

Myth: Root canals usually fail.

It is rare for a root canal to fail. In terms of this dental treatment, a root canal failure would mean that the inserted filling comes out, which can happen if a tooth is in severe enough shape before the treatment. Normally, there is no issue with this, but root canals can fail if there are unaddressed issues with infection.

Myth: You can see the difference when a root canal is done.

You can’t see a root canal in a tooth at all from the exterior. This myth comes from outdated dental treatment practices that often relied on amalgam filling material, which is grey and could be slightly visible through the tooth in some cases. Modern root canals are performed with a mixture of amalgam, composite, and other filling materials. Amalgam materials may be used lower in the root and composite used in the outer part of the tooth to retain its color and appearance.

Talk to Us About Your Root Canal Questions

When you have a root canal performed, you can be adding years of life and use to a tooth that you would otherwise lose. It is so important to get a root canal right away if this is something your dentist that your dentist is recommending. Reach out to us at Colorado Root Canal Specialist to schedule an appointment if you believe you need a root canal.

How to Prepare For a Root Canal

When the tooth’s nerves and the pulp becomes inflamed or infected, your doctor may recommend root canal treatment. During a root canal procedure, the interior part of the tooth is cleaned and dried. A dentist then adds a temporary filling. One of the primary reasons the procedure is carried out is if a person is experiencing deep decay. This occurs when bacteria in the mouth produce acids that damage the teeth. If left untreated, tooth decay can result in excruciating pain and tooth loss. Here’s how you should prepare for a root canal:

Stay Away from Alcohol

It’s normal to feel anxious before a root canal, and you may be tempted to get drunk to reduce the worry. Avoiding alcohol means you’ll be mentally and physically ready for the dental procedure. A root canal isn’t a painful treatment, as many people tend to think. When you get drunk, you’ll only make the discomfort associated with the root canal worse. Also, dentists will inject local anesthetics into the gums during the treatment, which may lead to adverse reactions to alcohol.

Ensure You Eat

When preparing to undergo a root canal, a lot of things may come into your mind. For example, you may be wondering whether or not to eat. You’re not alone. Many physicians recommend their patients to take normal meals before going for a root canal. After the procedure has been completed, you will be numb, and you may not feel like eating for a while. If you decide to eat while experiencing the numbness, you risk biting your tongue.

Avoid Taking Medications Before Your Appointment

Unless your doctor has prescribed some drugs, ensure you avoid them before you go for root canal treatment. Some people may decide to take painkillers before an appointment. This causes discomfort and makes it hard for physicians to offer the right diagnosis. According to experts, pain management medications tend to mask discomfort you may experience after a root canal.

Get Some Rest

Having plenty of rest is necessary to ensure the effectiveness of the dental procedure. Many people tend to be nervous when undergoing a root canal. However, technological advancements have helped to improve the experience. Failure to get adequate sleep will result in more anxiety and irritability. Also, note that the recovery process for human bodies is faster when at rest. Therefore, sleeping is also necessary after treatment.

For more information about preparing for your root canal, talk to your Colorado Root Canal Specialist.